Temples Outside Siem Reap

Siem Reap and the Angkor Archaeological Park has plenty of both ancient Hindu and Buddhist temples which are all fascinating in its architectures and stories. Most famous and notable temples such as the Angkor Wat, Bayon and Ta Phrom are located in the Small Circuit. Furthermore the Grand Circuit also proves to be popular and worth a visit. However there is a collection of ancient temples just outside of Siem Reap that are also fascinating and have such important significance. The only outlying temple I visited was Banteay Srei which was 40km away from Siem Reap just to see for myself if it is worth the visit.

Below is my experience visiting Banteay Srei and information on the other temples outside of Siem Reap I have gained on my visit.

Banteay Srei

Banteay Srei is the only temple I visited outside of the Angkor Archaeological park. This is included in the temple pass (maybe even the furthest included in the pass), so no other ticket is required and you would only need to get there. Banteay Srei also known as the ‘lady temple’ or ‘pink temple’ is a temple complex built in the 10th century and dedicated to the Hindu god Shiva. Quiet uniquely this temple wasn’t built by a King (King Rajendravaman II)  but two counsellors.

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This temple built using pink sandstone (as it is easier to carve) proved to be one of the best preserved, renovated and protected. Unlike other temples Banteay Srei is more or less complete as there is very little rubble still waiting to be restored. The complex itself has excessive barriers and cordons protecting the artwork and structures, more than any other temple I have visited. There are reasons for its extensive protections as this temple has one of the most detailed artwork, Its fine carvings has given Banteay Shrine the reputation of being the ‘Jewel of Khmer Art’.

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At 40km out of Siem Reap and the Archaeology Park, using a tuk-tuk proved to be excessive. As this temple was the first we visited on the day the excitement was high at the start but then it started to die down the longer the journey took. The tuk-tk was hot, bumpy and dusty but you do feel their interesting culture and ways of life something which you wouldn’t in a car. The weather on the day was not on our side as it was over 40 degrees which was highly uncomfortable. However the temple itself was magnificent, its colour and highly detailed artwork was unlike any other and the reason to visit this complex is due to its carvings and unique architecture.

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Others

The temples below are other temples that have longer distance from Siem Reap and the Angkor Archaeology park. I didn’t visit the temples below as I either didn’t have time or I purposely missed these as I deem them unnecessary to visit. Remember you do get a sense of temple overload  and it could be a bad experience to see too much of temples during your visit. However here what I know about these temples.

Beng Mealea – Unofficially known as the ‘jungle temple’ due to the ruins which still lack restoration resulting in the jungle growing over the rubble and the overall complex. This temple is one of the furthest from the Archaeological park at around 70km away from Siem Reap and due to its distance this is one of the least visited. An excellent temple for those who want to visit a peaceful temple with a brilliant jungle setting.

Beng Mealea (Photo taken from https://www.centralsuiteresidence.com/blog-detail/beng-mealea-temple.html)

Koh Ker – 120km from Siem Reap and the Archaeology Park this is the furthest temple to get to. Koh Ker the seven levelled square pyramid temple made of sandstones which is situated a jungle. This temple is not included in the temple pass and will require a separate ticket fee.  As this temple is the furthest away it is also said to be the least visited, meaning it would be one of the most peaceful.

Koh Ker, Prasat Thom
Koh Ker, Prasat Thom (photo from https://www.flickr.com/photos/azwegers/6225843693)

Prasat Phnom Krom – This is one of the temples I do regret not visiting. Reason being is that this temple lies on top of a hill (named Phnom Krom) just outside Siem Reap. There are three square shrines dedicated to the Hindu gods Vishnu, Brahma and Shiva all beautifully decorated. It is said to have marvellous views of Siem Reap and a good place to see the sunset. This place is not heavily visited by tourists so it is both scenic and a quiet peaceful atmosphere.

Phnom Krom (photo taken from https://justsiemreap.com/temple-guide/phnom-krom/)

Conclusion

In conclusion I was happy that I visited Banteay Srei but regret not taking time to visit Prasat Phnom Krom for its apparent marvellous views. Banteay Srei was incredible but its journey was a little much for it (in my opinion), which makes me think that Koh Ker and Beng Melea would’ve been excessive to see a single temple. Which means this could be a big downer if these temples prove to be very similar to those of the Small and Grand Circuit. Remember that I took the tuk-tuk so maybe the further you go it may be a good idea to think about taking a much more comfortable car instead.

Plenty say the further you go the quieter it gets, however in my experience this can sometimes be false as huge tour buses do venture out resulting into mass visitors making these temples as crowded as the ones in the small and grands tours.

Thanks or reading, please follow and share if you enjoyed it

Please read my further experience:

  1. Tickets, Entry to the Temples
  2. Small Circuit
  3. Grand Circuit
  4. Further Temples

and also read my full experience in

GIF 1

Reference:

justinsiemreap.com

Tokyo

Type : City
Best Date : 
Sep-Nov, Mar-May
Expense :
Expensive
Things to do : Sightseeing, Dining, Shopping, kart tours, ect
Points of Interest: Meiji Shrine, Tokyo Imperial Palace, Senso-Ji, Ueno Park, Ginza District, ect
The Good: Friendly and respectful people
The Bad: Very complex and busy public transport, Expensive

Brief

Tokyo (formerly known as Edo) is the capital and the largest city of Japan. However the city or prefecture was not always the country’s capital, as this always moved around depending on where Japan’s emperors wanted them. Furthermore greater Tokyo is said to be the most populated city (according to worldatlas) and known to be an alpha world city the largest modern metropolis in the world.

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The Place

Tokyo was the third and last city I visited during my tour of Japan. My expectations before I visited was a bustling metropolis full of the most modern technologies and infrastructure. Researching before my travels I found the city to be very reputable, which has more acclaimed restaurants than anywhere in the world, even more than Paris. Furthermore it is said to be one of the most safest capitals in the world with the lowest crime rates  than any around the world especially against tourists.

Firstly one of the must do activity in Tokyo is shop, as the city known as the best tax free shopping around the world. Ginza is an upmarket district in central Tokyo which has the most famous brands such as Gucci, Armani, Chanel and many alike. Furthermore many nightclubs, hotels, cafes and restaurants are also around here.

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Another shopping area in Tokyo that centre around the younger audience is Harajuku and Aoyama. This is a small narrow street bustling with affordable garments, accessories, toys and adventurous deserts , souvenirs are also found here and I believe the best place to buy them.

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Shinjuku is also another place for shopping, and centred around the middle working class community. Here there are the  more affordable brands such as Uniqlo, Lumine, Muji and others alike. 20180601_013022

However probably one of the most famous shopping district around the world, due to its bustling atmosphere is Shibuya. Most notable for the ‘Shibuya Crossing’ which has featured in many movies such as ‘Lost in translation’, ‘Fast and the furious’ and ‘Resident Evil’. The crossing is said to be the busiest intersection worldwide and is beautiful moreover at night when all the lights make for a great picture phot opportunity. Restaurants fill the streets in this area and there are a lot more amusements such as arcades, karaoke and clubs.

Apart from shopping there are also various attractions you could visit in Tokyo, its newest attraction which opened in 2012 is the ‘Tokyo Sky Tree’, this is a broadcast centre which is fast becoming the city’s cover attraction. Including restaurants and a observation deck this building is inspired by traditional Japanese architecture and is a great place to go if you are looking to see the city from a different view.

A much older point of interest in Tokyo is the ‘Meji Shrine’ which is not too far from the world famous ‘Shibuya’. This shrine is located in a calm tranquil area in the middle of the beautiful ‘Yoyogi  park’, which is again a sight to see in the cherry blossom season. Completed in 1920 the shrine which is dedicated to the Emperor ‘Meji’ and Empress ‘Shoken’ is surrounded by ‘Meji Shingu’s Forest’ which is entered through 2 large ‘Torii Gates’ one in the northside and the other southside. Pass these gates there is still a serene 10 minute walk to the shrines complex and upon arriving there is plenty exhibitions such as banzai trees, artwork, rituals and many others. The complex itself had various traditional architecture which is an excellent place for photographer type tourists and is a definite must whilst visiting Tokyo. There is a lot to see in the vicinity of the forest and you may stumble upon the ‘Kiyomasa Wells’ and the ‘Sake Barrels‘. Overall I believe that this was the best place to visit in Tokyo.

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‘Tsukiji Hongwanji’ is an operating Buddhist temple with free admission for tourists. It is a landmark for the Tsukuji area. Built on 1657 this temple has had huge historic significance. For me it was just a simple touch and go visit, so I am unable to give more information.

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Next to the temple is ‘Tsukiji Fish market’ a haven for fish or sushi lovers, a place where wholesale fish occurs, viewers are able to observe tuna auctions. Moreover there are plenty sushi restaurants where you are able dine and also learn the trade. Other produce are also sold here so for any food lovers this market is worth visiting.

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Lastly the ‘Imperial Palace’ which is the current residence of Japans Imperial family. It is actually the location of where Edo castle used to be. An interesting fact was that the palace was destroyed during the world war but then rebuilt in the same way afterwards. Similar to that of Osaka castle the imperial palace is bordered by huge stone walls and bridges which are appealing but does get in the way of a good picture. Take note no visitors are allowed inside the complex nor the buildings, however guided tours are available for the palace grounds.

Other places to visit are the ‘Senso-Ji Temple’, ‘Mount Fuji’ and various other museums and parks but I didn’t have time to visit them so I wont write about them.

Conclusion

All in all Tokyo was an interesting metropolis, it was definitely the busiest place ive been, a working city just like London. However unlike Kyoto and its magnificent shrines, in my opinion Tokyo’s main appeal for tourism is its shopping and dining as it doesn’t have many historic buildings. In my opinion a 3 or 4 days visit is enough in the city, stay very close to central of Japan and most places should be walking distance.

Back to my Japan Trip
Reference:

According to worldatlas.com  (Population)
https://www.factinate.com/places/30-interesting-facts-tokyo/
http://www.globalblue.com/destinations/japan/tokyo/top-ten-most-interesting-facts-on-tokyo

How do you travel?

Do you buy cheap airfares or pay the price for the experience?

There is now the popular arguments between family, friends and even oneself on whether to travel cheaply or pay more for the added perks on flights. We know there are two types of carriers, “standard or premium airliners” which we recognize as flag carriers and even somewhat being the symbol of aviation in its country, secondly the increasing popularity of “budget or low cost airlines” the companies giving passengers very cheap tickets for the bare necessities (no thrills as its known).

I work for an airline and I know that the battle of the skies is difficult for every carrier out there. Its simple that the more passengers the higher profitability which will also illustrate its reputation. Wealthy carriers consistently advertise, upgrade seats, product and services. Budget airlines spend less which enables them to lower tickets, this results in no food (buy on-board), less legroom (more row of sellable seats), undesirable airports and many more. Standard and budget airliners are now far apart on the service it offers, for us as passengers there is now a huge choice and it is something that divides opinions.

So what is your method in flying?

Budget/ Low cost Airlines (Flying Cheaply)

Departure, Airbus, Airline, Arrival, Low-Cost Airlines

Advantages

Spend less money (more for the holiday itself)

One of two reasons I believe people travel with budget low cost airlines, is the price. There are many people who believe that air transport is only a small part of the holiday and would rather spend more on hotels and activities than a simple flight. Furthermore if the flight is only 1-2 hours there is no real effect on sitting in a budget airline than that of a more luxurious one.

Only pay for what you need

There is plenty of aspects on a standard airline company that an individual traveller doesn’t desire, such as insurance, food and even baggage weight. This is something budget airliners capitalises on and gives passengers the choice to pay for only the services you require, which is popular amongst many youthful travellers who aren’t swayed by insurance protection or seat choices, this is normally known in aviation as ‘no thrills’ flights.

Disadvantages

Less Comfort

Everybody has heard the saying that ‘you get what you pay for’, which is true when it comes to spending on flights. Easily seen when you book economy, business and first class within a single carrier and somewhat true when choosing between standard and budget flights. Cheap airlines usually only incorporate the essentials (the product required by law) which are very basic seats, a stowage and a toilet (no thrills as they call it). Take note low cost airlines have also been looking at the possibility of charging to use toilets but were unsuccessful due to various laws. Leg space is also affected and many (not all) budget carriers give the bare minimum required by the law, in order to increase the number of rows which will fit more people.

File:Easyjet a319 interior in flight arp.jpg - Wikimedia Commons

No Baggage Allowance

If you know about aircrafts, you would know that weight is a big issue. The heavier the plane the more expensive fuel it uses resulting in higher costs, reason why many airliners are strict on baggage weight. Cheaper budget airlines do not give complimentary baggage weight as these need to be purchased, usually at a high cost.

Undesirable Airports

Getting away from huge costs and taxes reputable airports demand are something low cost carriers prefer to get away from. This enables them to avoid charges such as parking and facilities, overall lowering ticket prices to sell to customers. However although very attractable to customers at first (due to prices), these airports may be further and somewhat difficult to get to, resulting in further costs and unnecessary journeys to and from the airport.

Less protection

Many have experienced the undesirable event of delays, cancellations, overbooking, missing a flight and even damaged luggage’s. Many budget carriers do not include protection for these in your ticket bill, and again would require to purchase if you want one, some being very expensive.

Standard/ Premium Airlines (Pay for the experience)

British Airways

Advantages

Better products, comfier and more convenient

Standard and premium airlines attract their customers for the product and service they offer. Leg space and recline and comfier seats are usually the simple advantages from budget to premium airliners. Long-haul flights (on standard/ premium flights) usually have IFEs (In-Flight Entertainment) which budget carriers do not equip themselves with due to its initial and running costs. Simpler products such as storage, tables and arm rests are also usually enhanced (depending on airline carrier) and probably the most important in the modern world are charging points which are now being increasingly introduced in all tiers on these airline companies. Furthermore these airlines also lend blankets and pillows for extra comfort something that low cost carriers do not.

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Meals and giveaways

Depending on the journey and duration of flight the airline would offer complimentary meals, it could be breakfast, lunch, dinner or a snack depending on the time of the flight. Two meals may be offered for longer long-haul flights depending on the carrier. Amenity kits are sometimes offered on standard airlines but on budget carriers food and amenities must be purchased.

However take note that even premium/ standard carriers are starting to roll out a buy on board system (buy your meals) on short haul routes this is a model that may increasingly be popular and even the norm in the future.

Higher Standards

For premium and standard carriers, their brand is most precious, to attract customers means to give customers the best they can give. Usually the products on more expensive carriers are steadier and more robust, generally made from better quality materials. Inflight meals are also of better quality than what you can get in low cost carriers as their budgets for these would be paid for in the ticket prices. Furthermore Staff appearance (uniforms) are usually better and more fashionable than that of budget carriers and their training are far better which would results in better customer service.

Standard Baggage

Depending on the airline you travel with, there will be complimentary baggage weight for you to use (usually 20kg-40kg), this is something that is not included in cheaper carriers and thus an advantage for premium and standard airliners.

Choice of classes

If money is not a big barrier for you, standard airliners offer different classes and tiers, these have different products, services and food, something that budget airlines don’t offer. Depending on your standard of life, to be able to choose your tier and how much money you want to spend is another advantage over cheaper airlines with only one standard cabin and layout.

Disadvantages

More expensive

Probably the only big disadvantage of standard and premium airlines, is the cost of their tickets. Usually double or sometimes triple of that on a budget airline the price is usually the big reason why many turn away from high end carriers.

Overall

There are positives and negatives flying both budget/ low cost and standard/ premium airlines, it just depends on the type of traveller and travel you are or having.

On a personal view, I am content to fly with both low-cost and standard airline companies for shorthaul flights but would edge more in favour for expensive carriers for long-haul flights as long as I am happy with the service I can get.

I wouldn’t mind flying budget/ low cost for Journeys less than 2 hours (short-haul) such as domestic routes or flights to neighbouring countries. These routes are too short for me to care about the service I receive as I usually just fall asleep for the duration of the flight without needing to eat, drink or be entertained. My only disadvantage would be the airports I may likely be arriving or departing from as it may be too far and inconvenient for my target destination. However if the price difference from budget to standard are not too great then I would spend that bit more for the extra perks.

On longer (long-haul) flights I would pay the price for the extra service and comfort provided by standard/premium carriers. This is because travelling to the likes of Dubai which is 8hrs or Hong Kong 13hrs (from London), is just way too long for no thrills. Simple aspects such as blankets, pillows and meals would benefit largely in a long flight, likewise a big advantage are the IFEs (In Flight Entertainment) which would largely entertain anyone for many hours. Furthermore to be able to eliminate the fuss of further spending before , during and after the flight (on long journeys) would make travels so much better knowing everything is paid for in advance and all you need to think about is the holiday ahead.

So in conclusion, the most important aspect of the flight for me is the experience and not the money I spend as I’ve always seen the flight as a part of your holiday (the beginning). However if there is very little to no difference on the flight experience I am choosing from, then why should I spend just for the sake of a brand.

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Photos:

Easyjet - Photographed by Adrian Pingstone

Kyoto

Type : City, Provincial
Best Date : Feb-May
Expense : Expensive
Things to do : Sightseeing, religious prayers, dining, shopping, dress up in kimono, ect
Points of Interest: Nijo Castle, Fushimi-Inari, Kiyomizu-Dera, Gion, Kyoto Impreial Castle, Nishi Hogan-Ji, ect
The Good: Best preserved Japanese culture
The Bad: Generally expensive

Brief

Kyoto is another of Japans former capitals. Rich and famous for is various Buddhist temples, shrines, gardens, imperial palaces and wooden houses. The Prefecture or city is said to be the historical and cultural centre of the country with its traditional society, dining and architecture still experienced today. The kaiseki dining and the female entertainers known as geishas are found within this city.

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The Place

Getting a train from Osaka to Kyoto (S rapid train) within 30minutes was amazing to say the least, even though it was very busy and crowded. I was expecting to get out of a very rural small station but was surprised to arrive to a large station just like Osaka central. Walking out of the station I was starting to get a vibe that Kyoto was anything but provincial but another metropolis.

I arrived in Kyoto in the evening and planned to check-in and head straight out to visit what I could. The first building you see once stepping out of the main entrance of the station is ‘Kyoto Tower’ which is an observation tower overlooking the city, I didn’t enter the building but ive heard its a sight to see. After we planned a trip to a place called Shijo Dori (Shijo Street) to have something to eat and see what the nightlife is like as it was also the area for their clubs and bars. Walking around the streets there were plenty of shops some more traditional than others. Arcades were also a big thing around these streets and can get very busy with local children, some even still in their school uniform.

The next morning we went to ‘Fushimi Inari-Taisha’ it rained but this gave our experience a little more character. Dating back to year 794 when Kyoto was capital, this shrine is one of the most important which is dedicated to the Shinto god of rice, Inari. The iconic shrine is famous for having over a thousand orange vermilion torii gates which routes up mount Inari and into the wooden forest. The experience was incredible, the whole visit took about 3-4 hours in total trekking up and down the shrine. There were plenty of stops and different shrines to visit. I saw lots of fox statues and didn’t know what they were for till I found out that foxes are seen to be the messenger for the God Inari. The top of the mountain (shrine) was a bit of an anti climax (in my opinion) as there was nothing different than the various shrines that you pass along the way.

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After hiking for almost 3-4 hours, we went back to Shijo street then got something to eat in ‘ Nishiki market’ which is known to have the best traditional food in the city.

On that same day we also visited the ‘Kiyomizu- Dera’ which is a one of Kyoto’s notable attractions. ‘ Kiyomizu Dera’ is a huge Buddhist temple which is significant to the city and named a UNESCO world heritage site. When I visited the main building was being refurbished and had plenty of scaffolding and a cover, so it wasn’t as picturesque as it would normally be. Nonetheless the Kiyomizu-Dera is one of Kyoto’s main attractions and must be visited, even with all the construction the place was still very beautiful and scenic.

‘Gion’ is also an excellent place to visit especially in ‘ Hanamikoji Dori’ the street famous for the Geisha tradition. Filled with long-established wooden buildings, this area is also famous for its traditional dining and hospitality. The walk is only about 10 minutes from one end to the other and the Geishas are rarely seen, there are very strict rules in the street which include no touching of the geishas, selfie sticks, littering and others alike. Take note although dining here is a must, it is very expensive.

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Nishi-Hogan-Ji is another place that should be visited as it is the largest school for a particular type of Buddhism. Here you will find beautiful large traditional Japanese architecture.

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One place that is not really advertised for tourist to visit is actually an observation point above Kyoto station. Here there are views of Kyoto but the most observed are its stairs with LED lights acting like one huge screen where short light shows happen. I don’t know a special name for this place but yeah, the light stairs!

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Conclusion

Kyoto was the best place I went to in for Japanese culture and history. I was expecting a provincial rural atmosphere but was surprised that the whole city looked like a miniature Osaka and Tokyo with many lit up and technological areas such as ‘Gion’. Although it rained when I was there, this only just gave the city more character. Tourists rent Kimonos and Geisha outfits whilst around the city. This was interesting as this is not done in any other place around the world with their local traditional outfits. I did however under estimate the time I needed in the city, so there were plenty more places I haven’t visited.

Back to my Japan Trip
Reference:

https://www.japan-guide.com/e/e3915.html

Photo:

www.circumnavacation.com (Kyoto station light show)
663highland (Nishi Hogan Ji)

Vienna

Type : City Break
Best Date : April-May, September- October, December
Expense :  Medium
Things to do : Sightseeing, Christmas Markets
Points of Interest: Schonbrunn Palace, Prater, St Stephens Cathedral, Hofburg, Belvedere, Kunsthistorisches Museum, Rathaus ect

Brief

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Vienna is Austria’s capital and largest city with a population of about 1.8 million. Vienna is a widely German speaking city and is known for its rich imperial buildings, the orchestra and Viennese events. Most notable names that graced this city is Beethoven, Mozart and Franz Schubert.

The Place

So why did I choose to go Vienna?

Yearly I have made it a tradition to go to a country which is known for their Christmas Markets. In the year 2016 after previously going to the Berlin Christmas Markets, I planned to go somewhere other than Germany, It was a choice of either Brussels, Vienna, Prague or Budapest. I somehow resulted in choosing Vienna from many research and many colleagues having only good opinions towards it. My own personal opinion have also been positive.

Firstly I’d like to state that all Christmas markets are placed upon many of Vienna’s attractions (points of interests) such as Schonbrunn Palace, Maria-Theresien Platz, Belvedere Palace and the city hall at Rathuasplatz, so visiting a Christmas market would mean also visiting a Viennese attraction. The Christmas markets in Vienna usually starts on the second week of November till around Christmas eve or boxing day, some also open till the new year.

Belvedere Palace is a world heritage site now used as an art gallery. Its gardens and stables are a sight to see with its main appeal being the pond at the front of the palace. It is free to enter the gardens and exterior of the palace, however a fee is required to visit inside.

Large public square Maria-Theresien Platz is another attraction to visit. Central to many of Vienna’s museums such as the ‘Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien’ or their ‘natural history museum’. Theatres and parks are also very present in this area of the city.

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One of the most important building in the country is ‘Schonbrunn Palace’ a hunting lodge gifted to Emperor Joseph I from his father Emperor Leopold I. Through the years the building has grown and improved, with many different notable residents. With over 1441 rooms in this baroque palace (a former imperial residence) and a spectacular garden with exceptional scenery this is one of the top places to visit in Vienna.

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Spittelberg Quarter is a good place to visit for fine foods and its Christmas market.

Rathuasplatz which in my opinion the largest and main Christmas market in Vienna. Situated right in front of the beautiful lit up City Hall. The Christmas market usually opens early November and right through till early January. It has plenty of different stalls, from glassware, leathered goods, wooden products and many more. There is also many food stalls and an iconic ice ring (open till early March) centring the market.

Prater is a theme park in the heart of Vienna, it is a place for families and younger tourists. The theme park is one of the oldest in the world, and consist of cafes restaurants, bowling alley, cinemas and other attractions like Madame Tussauds . It is free entrance and you only pay for the rides you wish to ride, the main attraction is the Wiener Riesenrad (Viennese Giant Wheel) built in 1897.

 

Overall Vienna was a pleasure to visit, every area had an delightful festive atmosphere. Although when I visited (late November) it was a bit warmer than I thought or would have liked it to be, the city still sets the desirable winter trip. I do advise that if you are visiting Vienna, you visit on a weekday rather than a weekend, as the city seems to be close all day on weekdays (no shops and restaurants) so this will not be desirable for visitors.

Transport.

Getting There

(As of 2018)

Depending on your point origin, there are various ways to get to Vienna. From London Heathrow there are 3 carriers which offer direct flights, a trip from LHR to Vienna is around 2hours and a half flight time. Austrian A which is on average the cheaper out of the three carriers from Heathrow. British airways which is more frequent to travel to Vienna, meaning more choices of travel times and lastly Air Berlin which somehow has a single journey daily from Heathrow to Vienna however proving to cost more than the other carriers.

Easy Jet are the only carrier from Gatwick, and they do 2 journeys a day.

Lastly Eurowings journeys from Stanstead once a day and could be the cheapest carrier flying from London.

In Vienna

Please go to page ‘Travelling in Vienna’

Bath

Type : Countryside
Best Date : (summer) July- August, (winter) December
Expense :  Medium
Things to do : Sightseeing, Christmas Markets
Points of Interest: Roman Bath, Bath Abbey, Royal Crescent, Pulteney Bridge, Jane Austen Centre, ect

Brief

Bath is a small provincial town in the countryside southwest of England. Known for being a settlement for the Romans, largely occupied by 18th century Georgians whos infrastructure still stand today, the town is currently being modernised with new buildings (keeping a traditional architecture) and now extensively being visited for shopping and dining. Other recognized aspects of Bath are its Rugby, various schools, literature and its natural hot springs.

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The Place

Bath is a growing modern English town that has its historic attractions, its main appeal is the ‘Roman Baths’ which is a well preserved public bathing area. Attractions such as the Royal Crescent, Pulteney Bridge, Jane Austen Centre and Bath Abbey are the other popular interests in the town. Although the Roman Era are mainly introduced as the prime pioneers, it is the stone Georgian buildings which surround the town, however newer modern buildings have been completed for new shop complexes and many other establishments. Bath also sit upon a wave of various beautiful parks and is parallel to the river Avon which in itself has dazzling views.

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The ‘Roman Baths’ is a sight to see, and I believe is a golden attraction for the country. The entrance fee is affordable, about £15-£25 for adults, about £10-£20 for seniors and students whilst children’s tickets costing £8-£18 depending on the season of visit, however there are also family and seasonal tickets as well. Tickets include entrance to the Baths, aDSC_7091n extensive museum exhibit, an audio phone and a free taste of the spring water which I can describe as an earthy weak sparkling water. Best time to visit are said to be in the morning as the lines are not too long and the building not too busy. Firstly upon entering the building you appear in some sort of ticket room where you either collect or buy your ticket, this takes a short 5 minutes and afterwards you collect an audio form and some leaflets. After that you proceed straight to the terrace view of the bath itself and with your portable audio roam at your own pace. The whole museum is on a structured one way route type system, which is good for crowd control and so you don’t miss a thing. Throughout the exhibition there are many different videos, artefacts and even actors re-enacting along the way. Apart from the hot spring bath the best thing for me was the head (mask) of the patron goddess ‘Sulis Minerva’ who was worshiped by the British-Romans at the location. The life sized bronze head which was only seen by high priests at the time, is probably the most valuable and highly preserved item they have. Around the route there ardsc_71121.jpge plenty to see and even many places to take photos and in the end you will be able to visit the Gift shop which quite surprisingly has many soaps and shampoos instead of gifts.

Another attraction in Bath is Pulteney Bridge and the views of the Avon river, there are many different views locations within this area to rest and enjoy the scenes, one area which was really good was ‘Bath Garden’ along the Grande parade road, there were many different art work and floral display, but the downside was that the garden itself had an entrance fee of £1.50 which although not much turned many tourists away.

Bath is also a great place for a city getaway with an exceptional shopping avenue which include modern chains and prestige market stalls. Bath is also one of not so many places which host Christmas markets in the which is not yet popular in the United Kingdom but increasingly popular around Europe around the festive season.

 

Conclusion

In conclusion Bath is a days visit and not an overnight trip. The village is very small and can be explored again and again in just a few hours. A definite place for tourists to visit even if it is just for a few hours. There are many tours which include this town as an itinerary and I believe people visiting the UK should plan a day excursion here.